Queen Worker Drone started in 2016 as a way for first-time beekeepers, Brian and Caitlin, to record their learning and activities surrounding the practice of caring for honey bees. It also serves as way to share their newfound passion with friends and family. This mission continues today as the two "beeks" expand their apiary and explore more of what these winged little ladies have to offer.

Beekeepers:

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A Brief History

A Crazy Idea

The initial spark for keeping bees started after a long day of swimming and sunning at the beach. Brian and Caitlin made their long drive back home to the city, staring out on the New England landscape with the ocean behind them. They looked out on the rural horizon and saw a studded line of white boxes, recognizing them as local beehives.

They pondered the notion of taking up the agricultural hobby. Maybe later in life, something to do in their retirement. The two passengers imagined bottling honey for friends and family, perhaps even making a little money on the side. The idea seemed so beautiful and practical. They laughed out loud about the dream they would one day see realized. Then they began to ask: why not now?

Background

Caitlin and Brian met while studying photography at the Massachusetts College of Art. It was their love of the natural world and the documentation of its eccentricities and beauties that bonded them together. Beekeeping provided a chance for the two to work together on a singular project and vision; something that would enrich their creative lives while bringing a new sense of purpose to their most favorite of seasons.

Professionally, their skills and interests have brought them into different arenas of work. Caitlin installs new art exhibitions as a preparator in several museums around Boston, requiring a lot of problem solving and physical labor. Brian works primarily in business management, focusing on scheduling, accounting, and project direction.

Brian and Caitlin currently live in Watertown, MA, just a couple miles away from their hives at Rock Meadow Conservation.